The big picture


Mind Map

London Borough of Bromley (Downe Bank)

Chalk grassland develops on shallow lime-rich soils that are nutrient-poor and free-draining. These occur in London mainly on parts of the North Downs in the south, and Chilterns in the west. They support a wide array of wildflowers, butterflies, grasshoppers and other invertebrates, many of which are restricted to chalk soils. For the purposes of the plan, the habitat also includes young chalk scrub that has developed through a lack of management. Mature scrub and young chalk woodlands are not included.

Grass species like red fescue, sheep’s fescue and quaking grass are common, along with plants such as wild thyme, marjoram and common bird’s-foot trefoil. In addition, chalk grasslands support a range of orchids, many of which are nationally uncommon or scarce. The habitat is crucially important for butterflies, including those that are nationally or regionally scarce, such as grizzled skipper, dingy skipper, chalkhill blue, dark green fritillary, marbled white and, most notably, the small blue.



Hampshire County Council (Butser Hill)


Butser Hill National Nature Reserve (271m) is the highest point on the chalk ridge of the South Downs. It is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) has been proposed as a Special Area of Conservation (SAC), recognising its importance from a European perspective. This is due to the rich variety of flora and fauna located upon the hill. Butser Hill is in the top twenty Hampshire chalk grassland sites for its rich vascular flora, and is the richest chalk grassland site in Hampshire in terms of its bryophyte (125 species) and lichen (82 species) flora. As well as this, over 30 species of butterfly have been recorded, including populations of Duke of Burgundy and the Silver-spotted Skipper, making the area an important conservation area for many butterfly species.

The hill was purchased by Hampshire County Council in 1966 and is part of Queen Elizabeth Country Park. Prior to the purchase the summit was used for growing wheat. Since then it is open grassland grazed by rabbits, sheep and cattle.

The Country Park is twinned with Queen Elizabeth National Safari Park in Uganda. This is a project of cultural exchange and mutual support that focuses on conservation by working closely with and empowering local communities and supporting education initiatives. It also promotes the exchange of ideas and best practice between the staff of the two Queen Elizabeth Parks. The Queen Elizabeth Country Park in Hampshire thereby provides a practical gateway-concept into biodiversity management in East Africa. The educational frameworks are presented as concept management plans and mind maps.

Concept Plan
Concept management plan of Queen Elizabeth Country Park

Mind Maps
Butser Hill and Oxenbourne Down

Natural England (Parsonage Down)


Parsonage Down is one of the most outstanding chalk downland sites in Britain. It is an SSSI and part of a National Nature Reserve owned by Natural England. Situated on the Upper Chalk of the southern edge of Salisbury Plain, the site is of particular interest as an extensive area of flat and gently sloping land, much of which has escaped ploughing and other agricultural improvement during the last 100 years.

Management







The NNRs on the East Hampshire Downs comprise Butser Hill, near Petersfield, a large area of chalk grassland on the highest point in the South Downs (a large area is also designated as a Scheduled Ancient Monument reflecting its historical significance, particularly in the Bronze and Iron Ages);The NNRs on the East Hampshire Downs comprise Butser Hill, near Petersfield, a large area of chalk grassland on the highest point in the South Downs (a large area is also designated as a Scheduled Ancient Monument reflecting its historical significance, particularly in the Bronze and Iron Ages);The NNRs on the East Hampshire Downs comprise Butser Hill, near Petersfield, a large area of chalk grassland on the highest point in the South Downs (a large area is also designated as a Scheduled Ancient Monument reflecting its historical significance, particularly in the Bronze and Iron Ages);